Raine and Horne

Right: Super brand’s pivotal role: Securing Sydney Airport landholding at Mascot after WW1. of prime CBD land fronting George, Market and Pitt Streets in the city centre. As Elizabeth Warburton notes in her book Private Property: A Family and a Firm, in 1910 several lots on the Market Street side were sold under the guidance of Raine & Horne. As both the firm’s reputation—and the colony of Sydney— continued to grow, the firm managed a large number of noteworthy commercial transactions such as the 1913 sale of the Imperial Hotel in Sydney’s Carrington Street, which secured a price of £42,500, as well as a range of office buildings, bulk stores and shops located throughout the city. Shaping the character of Sydney The commercial property market is often a bellwether of economic wellbeing, and following the Great Depression, during which building construction slowed significantly, Sydney experienced a tremendous construction boom, and this saw the firm play a key role shaping the commercial character of Sydney’s CBD. Between 1934 and 1936, a bold move by local government authorities saw the extension of Martin Place, the civic Playing a role in the establishment of Sydney’s Kingsford Smith airport After returning from World War I as an officer in the Australian Flying Corp, keen aviator Nigel Love was hoping to establish an aerodrome in Sydney. In 1919, he approached Raine & Horne enquiring if any land was available that would be suitable for such a site. As Nigel Love’s son John recounted to The Australian: “The firm’s representative advised Love, “Look you may be lucky because there’s an abattoir out at Mascot that’s closing down. They’ve got a number of paddocks that would be suitable for landing an aircraft”. So the two men drove immediately to visit the site. It was the beginning of Kingsford Smith International Airport, and today, ‘Love’s paddock’, is the oldest continually operating airport in the world, moving 40 million passengers annually. In August 2016, Sydney Airport officially named a new bridge linking to the Northern Airport Precinct after Nigel Love. Source: Love’s paddock shifts 40 million passengers, The Australian, 5 August 2016 Following the Great Depression, during which building construction slowed significantly, Sydney experienced a tremendous construction boom 105

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