Raine and Horne

Today, Raine Island is a marine sanctuary acknowledged as the world’s largest known rookery for the internationally endangered green turtles feel good – but has also helped Raine & Horne make a difference to the communities that have continued to support the super brand for 140 years. Raine Island – breeding ground for endangered green turtles. Located on the northern tip of the Great Barrier Reef, approximately 620 kilometres north-west of Cairns, Raine Island is named after Captain Thomas Raine, who recorded the island’s presence on his first journey north from Sydney as Captain of the Surry in 1815 . Today, Raine Island is a marine sanctuary acknowledged as the world’s largest known rookery for the internationally endangered green turtles (Chelonia mydas), and the most significant seabird rookery in the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area. While the tiny 32-hectare coral cay is inaccessible to the public, Raine Island and its turtle population is under threat from rising sea levels and tidal inundation. Newly laid eggs cannot survive under water, and each season thousands of adult turtles die from falls and entrapment in rocky cliffs. In 2016, the Queensland Government, BHP Billiton, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, the Wuthathi Nation and the Kemer Kemer Meriam Nation (Ugar, Mer, Erub) Traditional Owners and the Great Barrier Reef Foundation began collaborating on the five year, $7.95 million Raine Island Recovery Project to protect and restore Raine Island’s critical habitat and ensure the future of key marine species including the green turtles. The project aims to raise the height of the remote island through beach engineering and sand replenishment to protect turtle breeding grounds, with pool fencing installed on elevated sections to prevent turtles falling off sand cliffs. Drone technology allowed researchers to survey and chart topographic maps of the island, where as many as 60,000 turtles gather during the annual breeding season. Eye-in-thesky monitoring by drones was also used to confirm the success of the project, and in late 2016, Great Barrier Reef Foundation Managing Director Anna Marsden said early results were encouraging and marked a positive start for the five-year project. In 2022, the Raine & Horne Foundation donated $100,000 towards monitoring and tracking the green turtles currently undertaken by the Great Barrier Reef Foundation (GBRF). 83

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